ENVISAGE

SHOT ENTIRELY IN SUBJECTIVE CAMERA,

this is a different cinematic adventure

that will leave you questioning your own perception.

Follow a normal day in the life of three abnormal

characters, to experience life as another person for a

day.
  Shot entirely in subjective camera not only will you

see what our characters see, you also hear their

inner thoughts.

Meet Nelson, a middle-aged agoraphobic

man who hasn’t left his apartment in 10

years. Sophie – a fun loving 20 something,

juggles residency at the hospital and her

vivacious girlfriend Laura. Bryan, a late 20's, 

poster child for mediocrity, with no direction or

drive, splits his time being a video store clerk

and a drug dealer, which neither he excels at. With

a twist in each story, we leave the audience the chance to

ENVISAGE what will happen to our 3 characters.

FILMTHREAT.COM Review:

Rich Sturdevant’s feature film Envisage takes an experimental approach to its filmmaking, opting to give us the various characters’ stories by using the camera as their subjective point-of-view. In this way, for each segment covering a specific main character, we see exactly what they see, hear what they hear and, often, get the running voice over from inside their heads. The result is a unique idea to commit to for an entire feature film that is interesting at moments, tiresome in others.

The three main characters whose POV we get are separated in their own segments, though the three do crossover at certain moments. First up is Nelson (Fedjwick Sylvanus), a man who might be agoraphobic, possibly coping with obsessive-compulsive disorder (among any number of other anxiety issues), whose day revolves around watching an Audrey Hepburn movie and talking to his friend, Jerry, on the phone. When Nelson’s computer doesn’t boot up, he’s forced to head out to the local video store to find a copy of the film he wants to watch, an uncomfortable adventure that we undergo with him.

Next up is Sophie (Lizz Henderson), whose girlfriend Laura (Laura Rice) has just popped the big question. Laura and Sophie spend the day together, discussing their engagement and generally enjoying each other’s company, before Sophie has to head off to her residency (and reoccurring argument being the little amount of time the two get to see each other due to Sophie’s job). As they split, it becomes clear that Sophie is going somewhere, but it isn’t work.

The final segment follows a stoner video store employee, Bryan (Heath Silvercloud), who has cameo roles in the previous two segments. He goes about his day, getting stoned, selling weed and working at the video store. Not all that interesting or exciting a story, really, until he gets home after work.

Which brings out my main issue, as mentioned earlier, with the film. While the characters do have interesting aspects to them, for the most part time spent in their head isn’t all that fun or entertaining. Opening with the Nelson segment, for example, may be a nice approximation of the Hell going on in his head, but it also turns into the audience’s Hell. By the time you get to Sophie’s segment, you’re so drained by Nelson that it’s hard to re-engage with the film. Likewise, wrapping up with Bryan’s plight at the video store; if you’ve ever worked at a video store, or retail in general, you’ve got an idea of how exciting that can be.

That said, both Sophie and Bryan’s segments have twists to them that elevate their stories, and Bryan’s segment even has a moment that re-contextualizes much of what we’ve experienced in the Nelson segment. In other words, there are some truly intriguing moments to be found in the film, but maybe not enough to balance out the tedium.

Kudos must be given to the camerawork and the filmmaking that enabled that first-person point-of-view to work as well as it does. For the most part, unless you see the main characters in a mirror or in another segment, it’s as if you are indeed seeing, and experiencing, the world as they are. I can really only think of one or two moments where the camera seems to drift into a third person perspective, but due to the faithfulness of the camera to its central conceit throughout, I’m willing to accept that maybe there’s a mirror’s view that I’m seeing, and just didn’t notice it at first.

Envisage is an ambitious film with a very cool premise, which from a technical standpoint is almost executed flawlessly. From a story standpoint, the film is a little too realistic in its telling and therefore a little too boring in its execution. Really, it could all come down to setting the table with Nelson, whose inner-commentary and life is so overwhelmingly exhausting it makes the rest of the film that much harder to get through.



END CREDITS

Directed by

Rich Sturdevant


Executive Produced by

Lizz Henderson

Rich Sturdevant

                                                        
                                                              Co-Produced by


David Alexander Willis

Ron Bunney

 

Written by

Rich Sturdevant

Lizz Henderson

David Alexander Willis


Edited by

John Garry

 
CAST

Nelson Vanderbeek…………………………………………………….Fedjwick Sylvanus

Sohie…………………………………………………………………………..Lizz Henderson

Bryan (Video Store Clerk)...………………………………………..Heath Silvercloud

Laura………………………………………………………………………….Laura Rice

Video Store Manager………………………………………………….Kevin Kittridge

Melanie (Little Girl)…………………………………………………….Taylor Arnette

Jen (Little Girl’s Mom)………………………………………………….Cari Kabinoff

Donny Richardson……………………………………………………….John Mark Fitzgerald

Tao………………………………………………………………………………Steve Chiu

Daniel (Sophie’s Husband)…………………………………………..Rich Sturdevant

Seth (Sophie’s Son).…………………………………………………….Wezley Aaron Brandle

Emo Girl……………………………………………………………………….Zahida J.Kazar

Beach Waitress…………………………………………………………….Caitlin Brandes

Nelson’s Dream Girl……………………………………………………..Lauren LaRocca

Mexican Guy………………………………………………………………..Cesar Orozco

Tied-Up Girl………………………………………………………………….Mary Claire Fitzgerald

 

VIDEO STORE MONTAGE PATRONS

Ron Bunney

Buffy Hubelbank

Dan Welby

Ilgin Esemenli

David Alexander Willis

Marilinda Berni

 

OPENING CREDIT ACTORS

Nick Morris

Joshua Davis

Derich Heath

Eva Fried

Lygia Fried

Victor Perdomo Jr.

Glenda Lujan

Dylan Howie-Richardson

Jeff Richardson

 

CREW

Director of Photography……………………………………………………..David Alexander Willis

Sound Editor/Mixer…………………………………………………………….Brian Weber

Boom Mic Operators…………………………………………………………..Ray Gaona

                                                                                            Ilgin Esemenli

                                                                                            Ron Bunney

                                                                                            Brian Weber

Script Supervisor………………………………………………………………… Zahida J. Kazar

Hair and Makeup……………………………………………………………….. Carleigh Herbert

                                                                                           Brittney Silvercloud

Art Director………………………………………………………………………… Lizz Henderson

Production Assistants………………………………………………………….   Ilgin Esemenli

                                                                                            Merilinda Berni

                    Michele Fitzgerald

                    Zahida J. Kazar

Craft Services……………………………………………………………………..Errand Angels LA.com

 

 

                                       DONORS, SPONSORS & VOLUNTEERS

The Perfect Bite Co.

Tastebuds Culinary

Moore’s Delicatessen

KOST 103.5 FM

                                                     Kathy & Rick Sessinghaus

Vera Mijojlic

Melissa Charvis

MaryAnne Carlson

Grace Yacoub

Caroline Yacoub

Melissa Corkern-Davis

Eva & Lygia Fried

Pat Sturdevant

Marie Kordus

Carolyn Craig

Dan Welby

Isabel Arias

Buffy Hubelbank

Josh Gudwin

 Brian R. Williams

Todd Masterson

Cari Kabinoff

Mark Rudd

Vivien Killilea

Amanda Clark

Nick Morris

Jonathan Ausubel

John & Michele Fitzgerald

Cole Sheridan

Sarah Brdaveric

Ken Aaron

 

MUSIC

 

 

Songs

 

                                “ Up. Down                                                                     

Performed, written, & Produced by                                          

                 Josh Gudwin

 

 

                                                                        “FX-158”

                                                                  Performed, written, & produced by

                                                                                    Josh Gudwin

 

 

 

                                                     “Not by Blood”

                                                               Performed by Kiaire

                                                        Written by Victor Perdomo Jr.

                                               Produced by Bronson Blake Rosado

 

 

 

 Dancing Silly Productions would like to especially thank the following people for all their hard work and dedication that helped make this film a possibility.

 

David Alexander Willis

Brian Weber

Ron Bunney

Heath Silvercloud

Laura Rice

Buffy Hubelbank

Josh Gudwin

Ilgin Esemenli

Zahida J. Kazar

Cari Kabinoff

Mary Anne Carlson

John and Michele Fitzgerald

Jeff Richardson

Pam Henderson

Pat Sturdevant

 

This film was shot on location in Los Angeles, CA.

All characters and events in this film are fictitious. Any similarity to actual people and events are purely coincidental.

 

2016 Dancing Silly Productions

 

 

 

FILMTHREAT.COM Review:

Rich Sturdevant’s feature film Envisage takes an experimental approach to its filmmaking, opting to give us the various characters’ stories by using the camera as their subjective point-of-view. In this way, for each segment covering a specific main character, we see exactly what they see, hear what they hear and, often, get the running voice over from inside their heads. The result is a unique idea to commit to for an entire feature film that is interesting at moments, tiresome in others.

The three main characters whose POV we get are separated in their own segments, though the three do crossover at certain moments. First up is Nelson (Fedjwick Sylvanus), a man who might be agoraphobic, possibly coping with obsessive-compulsive disorder (among any number of other anxiety issues), whose day revolves around watching an Audrey Hepburn movie and talking to his friend, Jerry, on the phone. When Nelson’s computer doesn’t boot up, he’s forced to head out to the local video store to find a copy of the film he wants to watch, an uncomfortable adventure that we undergo with him.

Next up is Sophie (Lizz Henderson), whose girlfriend Laura (Laura Rice) has just popped the big question. Laura and Sophie spend the day together, discussing their engagement and generally enjoying each other’s company, before Sophie has to head off to her residency (and reoccurring argument being the little amount of time the two get to see each other due to Sophie’s job). As they split, it becomes clear that Sophie is going somewhere, but it isn’t work.

The final segment follows a stoner video store employee, Bryan (Heath Silvercloud), who has cameo roles in the previous two segments. He goes about his day, getting stoned, selling weed and working at the video store. Not all that interesting or exciting a story, really, until he gets home after work.

Which brings out my main issue, as mentioned earlier, with the film. While the characters do have interesting aspects to them, for the most part time spent in their head isn’t all that fun or entertaining. Opening with the Nelson segment, for example, may be a nice approximation of the Hell going on in his head, but it also turns into the audience’s Hell. By the time you get to Sophie’s segment, you’re so drained by Nelson that it’s hard to re-engage with the film. Likewise, wrapping up with Bryan’s plight at the video store; if you’ve ever worked at a video store, or retail in general, you’ve got an idea of how exciting that can be.

That said, both Sophie and Bryan’s segments have twists to them that elevate their stories, and Bryan’s segment even has a moment that re-contextualizes much of what we’ve experienced in the Nelson segment. In other words, there are some truly intriguing moments to be found in the film, but maybe not enough to balance out the tedium.

Kudos must be given to the camerawork and the filmmaking that enabled that first-person point-of-view to work as well as it does. For the most part, unless you see the main characters in a mirror or in another segment, it’s as if you are indeed seeing, and experiencing, the world as they are. I can really only think of one or two moments where the camera seems to drift into a third person perspective, but due to the faithfulness of the camera to its central conceit throughout, I’m willing to accept that maybe there’s a mirror’s view that I’m seeing, and just didn’t notice it at first.

Envisage is an ambitious film with a very cool premise, which from a technical standpoint is almost executed flawlessly. From a story standpoint, the film is a little too realistic in its telling and therefore a little too boring in its execution. Really, it could all come down to setting the table with Nelson, whose inner-commentary and life is so overwhelmingly exhausting it makes the rest of the film that much harder to get through.

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